That Mall is sick and that Store is dead!

August 19, 2011

Malls They’re Not Just For Shopping Any More (1989, Daily Press)

Splash! 2-24-89 (The Daily Press)

Article

I need to go to the library when I have a chance and get this article from the microfilm and see if there are any photos of the malls.

//edit, October 15, 2011//
Checked it out today, there was no photos.


Malls
They’re Not Just For Shopping Any More
February 24, 1989|By JILL POPISH KEECH Staff Writer

No one refers to it as the shopping mall anymore. It’s just “the mall,” and shopping isn’t the only thing you do there.

Where else can you go to the dentist or have your eyes checked, get a shoe shine or cash a check, all in a climate-controlled home-away-from-home atmosphere where you’re none the worse for wear if it’s raining cats and dogs outside?

You can play games in the video arcade and chow down on fast food, cafeteria or sit-down restaurant fare. Those reasons alone make the mall the hang-out of choice for many teens.

At some malls, you can have your taxes done or keep fit with a Mall Walk program.

If your feet give out or you’ve nothing better to do, sit on a bench in one of the landscaped areas and watch the world go by.

Other traits of “the mall”? It’s located in an easily accessible area of the city and offers a blend of ingredients, a carefully choreographed mix of goods, services and dining facilities all under one roof.

On the surface one mall may look like any other. But if you delve beyond the neon, past the merchandise carts and stalls that dot the corridors, personalities begin to emerge.

Tidewater has eight malls. Here’s the run down on what you’ll find at each.

COLISEUM MALL. 1800 W. Mercury Blvd., Hampton. 826-8386. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday – Saturday and 12:30-5:30 Sunday.

Coliseum Mall was the first mall to open on the Peninsula. The year was 1973, and the event revolutionized lifestyles, especially those of area teens who frequent the mall to see and to be seen.

With slightly more than 342,000 square feet, Coliseum Mall now is undergoing renovations due for completion this fall. Additions include a food court, skylights and a new fountain and information booth. Coliseum Mall Cinema will close shortly after April 1 due to the renovations. No plans exist for relocating the theater.

The mall has more than 125 specialty stores. Anchor department stores are JC Penney Co., Thalhimers, Hess’s and Montgomery Ward & Co. Other merchants include Children’s Palace, The Swiss Colony, Picture You, the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, the United Service Organizaitons (USO), Blue Hawaii Restaurant of Hampton and Picadilly Cafeteria.

Coliseum Mall is known for community service events and promotions like Little Mall, a children’s Christmas shop benefiting organizations including Riverside Regional Medical Center’s special care infant nursery.

Additional information: 5,000 parking spaces with about 1 percent for the handicapped include ramps to sidewalks and entrances, three wheelchairs for rent and special assistance upon request. Information booth in main court near Picadilly Cafeteria for stroller and wheelchair rentals (each $1 per hour), mall-wide gift certificates, mall brochure and map and information on area surrounding mall. Small fee for groups using community room.

GREENBRIER MALL. 1401 Greenbrier Parkway S., Chesapeake. 424-7100. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Greenbrier Mall opened in 1981, and seven years later a renovation project brought in two new anchor department stores and the Cafe Boulevard food court. A burgundy and peacock-blue color scheme characterizes the two-level mall, which boasts two glass elevators, one that goes directly from the parking lot to the food court.

The 770,000-square-foot mall contains 107 specialty stores. Anchors are Sears, Roebuck and Co., Miller & Rhoads, Hess’s and Leggett. Other merchants include Lechters kitchen store, Sunday’s Child for children’s clothing, the 11-merchant food court done in an old streetscape design, Great China Restaurant and Plitt Theatres with four screens.

Known for Mall Walk group with about 500 members, sponsored in conjunction with Chesapeake General Hospital; its teen fashion board, which presents community events and monthly fashion shows; and Brier Bear, the mall mascot featured during children’s events. Also sponsors Park and Ride with Tidewater Rapid Transit, which lets area residents park on mall property and get public transportation to major employment areas.

Additional information: 4,101 parking spaces, including 70 for handicapped. Handicapped services include wheelchair-accessible entrances, accessible restrooms and free use of two wheelchairs (available at information desk, located on lower level near Butler’s Shoe Store).

LYNNHAVEN MALL. 701 Lynnhaven Parkway, Virginia Beach. 340-9340. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Lynnhaven Mall, which opened in 1981 and encompasses 1,068,729 square feet, is Virginia Beach’s only two-level mall. It features a glass elevator and bronze reflective ceiling panels in the common mall corridors.

The mall has about 150 stores. Anchors are Miller & Rhoads, Montgomery Ward & Co., JC Penney Co., Leggett, Thalhimers and Hess’s. Other merchants include Crabtree & Evelyn; a Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles express branch; Deck the Walls for art; Lechters for kitchen goods; Recording Studios of America, where you can record a song on a cassette that will have your name on the label; a 19-merchant food court; Picadilly Cafeteria, Spinnaker’s and China Town restaurants; and 11 United Artists Theaters.

Additional information: 6,500 parking spaces, including 66 for handicapped. Other services for handicapped include ramps to all sidewalks, accessible restrooms and three wheelchairs for rent (free for first hour) at information booth, located at the mall’s main entrance near the glass elevator. Information booth also handles stroller rentals ($1 per hour). No charge to non-profit groups using community booth and common mall corridors. Virginia Beach Trolley service to and from the beach runs May 26-Sept. 25 ($1 each way).

MILITARY CIRCLE CENTER. 880 N. Military Highway, Norfolk. 461-1940. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Military Circle Center, known for its landmark location as the geographic center of Hampton Roads, opened in 1970, was expanded four years later and in 1987, skylights, fountains, interior landscaping and 30 stores or storefronts were added.

The mall sprawls over 1,169,195 square feet and includes the attached Sheraton Inn-Military Circle, which it owns, and more than 120 stores.

Anchors are JC Penney, Thalhimers, Smith & Welton and Leggett. Also houses McCrory’s variety store; The Bee Hive for books and magazines; Picadilly Cafeteria, Mundo Latino and The Subway; and AMC Circle 6 and Circle 4 movie theaters.

A mall trademark is the carousel in South Court ($1 a ride). The organization that owns and manages Military Circle is a subsidiary of The Rouse Co., developer of Harbor Place in Baltimore and The Waterside in Norfolk.

Additional information: 6,900 parking spaces, including 96 for handicapped. Other handicapped services include ramps to sidewalks, handicapped-equipped restrooms and free use of the wheelchair available through the mall office (Mall One entrance between the Sheraton and Leggett); telephone reservation for wheelchair suggested.

NEWMARKET NORTH MALL. Mercury Boulevard near Jefferson Avenue, Hampton. 838-09500. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Newmarket North Mall, which opened in 1975 with 800,000 square feet, is the only two-level Peninsula mall.

The mall contains 100 stores. Anchors are Sears, Roebuck and Co., Miller & Rhoads and Leggett. Other merchants include the Newmarket Mall 4 movie theater with four screens; Sal’s Italian Restaurant, Friendly restaurant and Morrison’s Cafeteria.

Newmarket North is known for its sunken courts landscaped with large planters around seating areas. It has received the Clean City Award for Malls from the Hampton Clean City Commission five out of the past six times. Offers Mall Walk program in conjunction with Sentara Hampton General Hospital and the American Heart Association.

Additional information: 4,028 parking spaces, including 20 for handicapped. Other services for handicapped include ramps to sidewalks, handicapped-equipped restrooms and free use of the wheelchair available through the mall office (corridor between Nautilus video arcade and Docktor Pet Center).

PATRICK HENRY MALL. 12300 Jefferson Ave., Newport News. 249-2342. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

When Patrick Henry Mall opened in 1987, it added the food court concept to Peninsula malls and more movie screens than any other mall on the Peninsula, as well as two theater concession stands. Intricately framed skylights and a mauve, gray, white and blue color scheme create a distinctive interior decor.

The mall offers 533,000 square feet of shopping space, which will include Leggett department store beginning this summer. Two more expansion projects are planned for two more anchors and some small shops; 73 stores now are open. Anchors are Bradlee’s and Hess’s. Other merchants include the five-merchant Patio Food Court, Valentino’s Italian Restaurant and AMC Patrick Henry 7 theaters.

Known for community events like Mary Immaculate Hospital kiosk, Mall Walk program, Signing Santa who meets with children from the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind and Wednesday Bingo starting again March 22. No charge to non-profit organizations using community room.

Additional information: 2,313 parking spaces, including 18 for handicapped; ramps to sidewalks; handicapped-equipped restrooms.

PEMBROKE MALL. Intersection of Independence and Virginia Beach boulevards, Virginia Beach. 497-6255. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12-30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Pembroke Mall, Virginia Beach’s oldest mall, prides itself as a friendly, family place to shop. It has been under the same local ownership since opening in 1966.

The mall has more than 800,000 square feet of shopping space with 100 stores. Anchors are Sears, Roebuck and Co., Hess’s and Miller & Rhoads. Also houses Big Girls Shop, which accommodates the longwaisted and heights to more than 6 feet; Bit of England for darts and other games; Cineplex-Odeon Cinemas 8; Tidewater’s only Swensen’s Family Restaurant, plus Annabelle’s Restaurant & Pub and China Garden Restaurant.

Known for being a family oriented mall, including the promotions like performances by the Children’s Raninbow Theatre of Richmond and local puppet troupe. No charge to non-profit groups for use of community booth.

dditional information: 3,057 parking spaces, including 42 for handicapped. Other handicapped services include ramps at sidewalks, handicapped-equipped restrooms and a wheelchair available courtesy of People’s Drug store (outdoor entrance at east wing of the mall, facing Virginia Beach Boulevard).

TOWER MALL. Intersection of Victory Boulevard and U.S. 264, Portsmouth. 488-4453. 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 12:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Attractive flag banners, wood beams and light fixtures that look like over-sized jacks highlight center court at Tower Mall, which opened in 1973.

Eighty stores are housed in 600,000 square feet of space. Anchors are Hess’s, Miller & Rhoads, Montgomery Ward & Co. and Bradlee’s. Also houses Morrison’s Cafeteria and Cinema I and II.

Tower Mall is known for its community involvement, including The Fit-Print Trail, a half-mile mall-walk program produced in cooperation with Maryview Hospital; and a student marketing and vocational education program. No charge to groups using community booth.

Additional information: 4,000 parking spaces, including 20 for handicapped. Other handicapped services include ramps at sidewalks, handicapped-equipped restroom in Montgomery Ward and free use of the wheelchair available through the mall office (back entrance of the mall, near Montgomery Ward).

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1 Comment »

  1. Tower Mall (now Vicrory Crossing) was along *Interstate* 264 (U.S. Route 264 is down in North Carolina)

    Comment by Michael Ragsdale — December 4, 2011 @ 6:42 pm | Reply


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