That Mall is sick and that Store is dead!

April 27, 2005

Home Of The Chris Rock Joke

Filed under: "coliseum mall" — Anita @ 2:50 pm

I was heartbroken to open up today’s Daily Press and read that another one of my childhood malls is reformatting:

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Re-imagining the mall
In a few years, Coliseum Mall could begin its evolution into a town center with mixed uses.

BY JODY SNIDER
247-7874

April 27, 2005

HAMPTON — The owners of Coliseum Mall think their property – the first mall developed on the Peninsula – has to start changing into the next big thing. They plan to do away with the 32-year old mall and develop a “town center” that would hold even more retail stores, plus residential condominiums, office buildings and possibly a hotel, Hampton officials said Tuesday.

Hampton Mall Associates plans to invest more than $200 million to turn Coliseum Mall into a town center, said Terry O’Neill, chief planner for Hampton.

The reinvention is a part of a national trend that has mall owners looking for solutions that will revive older properties like Coliseum Mall. Owners of similar older malls across the country are also looking for more shop-appeal for their older properties.

On 75 acres, Coliseum Mall currently has 89 tenants that employ 1,250 workers. A town center development, others of which are already being developed in the area, is defined as offering retail, professional offices, apartments or condominiums and civic services. Residences and offices are typically located among retail storefronts.

In its early days, the mall made the Coliseum area a vibrant shopping area on the Peninsula. In recent years, however, that area and the city have shown a sharp decline in taxable retail sales. As a result, the city last year announced that it had hired Pittsburgh-based Urban Design Associates to redesign the mall, as a part of an overall improvement plan for the city.

That early design included keeping several of the current buildings and using outdoor entries in to each of the buildings. The redesign of the mall is part of an effort to resurrect the Coliseum area as the city’s premier shopping and entertainment district. Although some of the early designs remain, the new town concept is an evolution that includes mixed uses. The redevelopment of the mall could begin in two years.

The property is already zoned for mixed-use development, city officials said.

Talks between the city and the mall owners began a few months ago, but city officials have not yet seen a model or plan of the proposed project, O’Neill said.

However, James Eason, director of economic development for Hampton, said the town center concept would keep one building while eliminating the rest of the current mall. Although jobs with current tenants at the mall would be lost in the redevelopment of the town center, Eason said there would be greater job opportunities with the newer retail offerings than what is currently available.

He said many of those people could be re-employed with new job opportunities.

Eason said the mall owners plan to present the town center concept to national retailers at a Las Vegas convention in May at the International Council of Shopping Centers. The annual convention is a place for developers to showcase offerings to retailers looking for markets to move into.

The presentation at the Las Vegas convention should help Hampton Mall Associates gauge national retailers’ interest in the proposed project, said Joel Rubin, a public relations spokesman for the mall owners.

“It will be a significant project, but there are no final figures and nothing has been finalized yet,” Rubin said. “The owners of the mall and the city are still in serious discussions about what to do with the site. Nothing is definite.”

O’Neill said a marketing study would be done to determine what the scale and the components of the project should be for the Hampton area. “We’re not sure of the square-footage yet,” O’Neill said. “We’re not sure what part of the mall stays or what part goes. The Las Vegas convention will give us an idea of retailers’ response. It will provide the meat on the bones for this idea.”

Coliseum Mall
Owners: Hampton Mall Associates
Opened: 1973
Anchors: Burlington Coat Factory, Hecht’s, JC Penney
Number of stores: 89
Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Sundays
Web site: coliseummall.com

Wellworth Cleaners (Dead 2003)

Filed under: dead stores — Anita @ 3:32 am


Wellworth Cleaners (Dead 2003)
Originally uploaded by Look In The Tunk.

Aw, the Wellworth Cleaners on Jefferson Ave in Newport News, VA. I loved, loved, loved this Shirt Laundriers mural on the wall there.

Wellworth went out of business (without telling anyone apparently, up until last year people’s dry cleaning was still in the store) in 2003, and in 2004 some bastards painted over the Mural. Those bastards!!!

I took this pic in 2002, and in 2004 I printed one out and gave it to my Art History teacher. She thought it was cute.

I also added two pics from a shut down Lowe’s hardware store in Suffolk, VA today.

Messing with homeless people isn’t such a smart idea either.

Filed under: deadmalls.com — Anita @ 3:26 am

This is a super old article, but its about the guys at Deadmalls.com, Peter & Brian:

Pair visits dead, dying malls

Studying monuments to consumerism

Friday, May 10, 2002

By Teresa F. Lindeman, Post-Gazette Staff Writer

Peter Blackbird has learned you can’t argue with a dog. Messing with homeless people isn’t such a smart idea either.

Still, braving the unknown is just part of the territory when your hobby is checking out dead and dying shopping centers.

This is the quest that drives Blackbird, 22, and Brian Florence, 25, to venture forth from their Queensbury, N.Y., hometown in search of adventure and new material for their Web site — http://www.deadmalls.com.

The address on the Internet is dedicated to the losers — the retail developments that may have been successful for decades but ran into trouble when another mall was built too close or the neighborhood changed. The Web site lists information on almost 40 shopping centers, speculation on what changed and even an offer for free advice on redevelopment.

It’s a mission for these guys but it must be said that it’s also a great excuse for road trips.

“We try to do one every other weekend,” said Blackbird. They’re running out of places nearby so the trips are taking longer, and they’ve got to hurry to get back to their real jobs. “It’s almost a marathon thing now.”

Their most recent haul brought them to Greengate Mall on Route 30 in Hempfield, an enclosed 650,000-square-foot shopping center that opened in 1965 but has declined in recent years. The last anchor, Montgomery Ward, closed last year.

The friends set off around 3 a.m. on a Sunday morning in April, drove all day and reached Greengate after 5 p.m. They spent about an hour driving around the mall, taking pictures and checking out nearby Greensburg.

“I’ve never seen a mall that old before,” said Florence, who sort of got hooked into this by his longtime friend but now finds himself fascinated by the architectural details and the life cycle of shopping centers. The two went to high school together, a few years apart.

After Greengate, they tried to find North Versailles where the once-bustling Eastland Mall has fallen on slower times. Information on the center that was sent in by a contributor is now posted on their site.

Instead, they ended up at Monroeville Mall, checking out a still-viable center built more than three decades ago.

Blackbird always had an interest in malls. It intensified after he helped convert Hills Department Stores into Ames department stores a few years ago. Many were in what he would call dying centers — places full of empty storefronts.

Florence takes credit for actually getting the project on the Web. “I was the one [who] talked him into getting the domain name.”

The site went up in October 2000 and has received 25,000 hits and numerous letters and e-mails since. “There’s a lot more people [who] are into this than anyone realized,” said Florence, who has a real job taking questions over the telephone about insurance. Blackbird works on an auto Web site for a local dealership.

Limited geographically by their job responsibilities, they’re happy to post contributions from people who’ve sent pictures and descriptions from all over the country. Sometimes it takes awhile to get the information up. The Greengate pictures haven’t been posted yet.

An amateur student of retail development, Blackbird has been reading books on edge cities and new urbanism. He quotes a study that predicts more than 200 malls will fail within the next three years. He’s bothered that many centers — usually huge buildings holding prominent locations in their communities — seem so disposable, often bulldozed to be replaced with big box stores.

“I can see Peter getting concerned about things that become eyesores,” said Ken Minges, director of guidance services for the Queensbury school district. Minges hadn’t seen the Web site before but remembered Blackbird from his school days as a polite young man who was never timid about taking a stand on social issues.

Community activism triggered by blighted shopping centers isn’t unusual.

“Anywhere that there is a dead mall, you definitely find a grass-roots movement to do something about it,” said Steven Bodzin, spokesman for the Congress for the New Urbanism, which promotes the cause of restoring existing urban areas and redesigning suburbs in more livable patterns.

In a 2001 study done for the organization, PricewaterhouseCoopers found that while the majority of U.S. malls were healthy, about 7 percent were considered to be failing, with sales below $150 a square foot, while another 12 percent were ranked vulnerable.

The Congress for New Urbanism advocates mixing other elements in with retail — housing, offices, educational facilities — so that if one area runs into problems, the others can carry the project through.

For the two friends, there’s another angle to their Web documentary. Tearing down malls also tosses away a repository of a community’s memories.

“I want to try and preserve what they were,” said Blackbird, who concedes he loves the old-style malls that seem dated but were once cool places to hang out. “I’m a product of my generation.”

For each center they visit, they try to gather names of stores that had been there and talk to local residents about their memories of the place.

The amateur researchers also have discovered that properties left untended too long can attract others. Since they try to get photos inside when possible, they relate stories of finding homeless people and animals settled in some locations. A friend checking out a mall that had been empty for more than a decade found lots of mold. When security guards tell the guys to leave, they do. The point isn’t to get into trouble. It helps that they take Florence’s 1994 Chevrolet Caprice, a used police car that still looks respectable.

And they usually make sure there’s time to shop for hard-to-find soda brands. Another hobby for Florence is tracking down regional sodas. Apparently, Pittsburgh is on the border of the area where Mr. Pibb soda can be found as well as a market for Cherokee Red soda.

April 22, 2005

Last month, I stumbled upon the Hills Department S…

Filed under: dead chains,dead stores — Anita @ 5:01 am

Last month, I stumbled upon the Hills Department Store Fan Site , and told the webmaster that I had an image of the Hills that was only open for a year and a half in Hampton, VA. So I shared it with him, and the article about the store closing in 1997:

http://www.hillsstores.com/Hampton.htm

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The Hills didn’t even have a going out of business sale. They closed a few days after the article ran in The Daily Press. The store still stays vacant (as of 2003, the last time I was out there). I remember for some reason all the store’s carts were padlocked and chained to the sidewalk beside the store for a few weeks after the store closed.

Even if the store was only open for about 18 months, I still have some memories from the store. Nearly all the current Christmas decorations my mom owns were from Hills. We always bring up the store every Christmas when we break out the decorations.

There was this one time that the manager (I think) gave out free popcorn.

April 17, 2005

I Love

Filed under: deadmalls.com — Anita @ 10:30 pm


DEADMALLS.COM
Originally uploaded by Look In The Tunk.

A couple of weeks ago, I e-mailed one of the guys who runs deadmalls.com ; Brian Florence. I told him that I really loved the site. He replied back, and one of the things he told me was “tell you friends [about the dead mall site].” Ooh, I one-upped him. I made this bumper sticker (out of an old citibank ad that ran in magazines this past summer)…too bad when I put it on my car, and looked out the rearview mirror, it blocked my view. Shoot. I have to find another place to put it on my car. I already have a MST3K sticker on my passenger side.

April 11, 2005

Cinnaminson Mall – Still Vacant

Filed under: dead stores,other malls — Anita @ 9:19 pm

Tom Asher’s Guide To Dead Retail

April 5, 2005

"all of your shopping needs in one climate controlled building."

Filed under: other malls — Anita @ 4:14 am

The Apache Plaza Tribute Site

Nice little website about a mall in Minnesota that deceased in 2004.

April 3, 2005

Patrick Henry Mall to get a renovation

Filed under: patrick henry mall — Anita @ 8:42 pm

Set to start this month, the $25 million project will attempt to reflect the region’s colonial roots.

BY NOVELDA SOMMERS (Daily Press)
247-4767

Published April 3, 2005

NEWPORT NEWS, VA — Patrick Henry Mall in Newport News is shedding its 1980s image for a new style that will attempt to evoke the region’s colonial beginnings.

A $25 million renovation set to start this month will include a remodeled food court with a super-sized fireplace, hearth and mantle like you might see in a Colonial Williamsburg home, only more dramatic, with an 8-foot-wide mantle.

Early American-style sconces will grace pillars encased in rich, dark woods. New skylights will bathe the area in natural light, and cushy seats will invite shoppers to linger. Large chandeliers will have the look of giant colonial-era lanterns.

Still trying to place the ambiance? Think Williamsburg’s Merchants Square storefronts meet Norfolk’s MacArthur Center Mall.

“It will be a complete renovation: new floors, lighting, ceiling, restrooms,” said Michael Fenchak, mall asset manager. “We’re taking a 1980s mall to a current state-of-the-art property.”

The makeover comes as the region’s shoppers have more modern mall choices if they’re willing to drive about 80 miles. The region’s newest malls – Richmond’s Short Pump Town Center and Stony Point Fashion Center – were built in 2003. Short Pump departed from the traditional mall design with open-air shopping designed around a courtyard, and Stony Point’s high-end stores are grouped around two outdoor plazas.

Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust bought Patrick Henry in 2003 with the intention of updating it, said Cheryl Dougherty, vice president of marketing.

“It is one of the top performing assets in our portfolio,” Dougherty said. “We feel there’s still an upside in taking it to another level.”

Create Architecture Planning & Design, of New York City, is creating the mall’s look. The building contractors who will complete most of the work have not yet been chosen, mall officials said.

The mall is adding a new section that will include a Dick’s Sporting Goods store, a major national bookstore and a restaurant. Fenchak said he could not disclose the names of the bookstore and restaurant because the deals are not yet signed.

Dillard’s department store recently consolidated its two Patrick Henry stores, and where the empty store currently sits will be a number of small retailers forming a corridor leading to the new anchor stores, Fenchak said, adding that mall officials are not ready to announce the names of the stores.

Construction is expected to take place in three phases, with the bookstore and restaurant set to open before Christmas.

Dick’s Sporting Goods is scheduled to open in March 2006. The Pittsburgh-based sporting goods chain has 234 stores after its acquisition of competitor Galyan’s in July. The new store will sit between the mall and Interstate 64.

Dick’s stores are set up as a series of areas it calls “shops,” selling footwear, golf equipment, fitness and exercise gear and clothing.

According to its Web site, it carries brand names including Nike, Adidas, The North Face, Callaway, Taylor Made, and a store brand called Adirondack Trading Co.

The chain has stores at Lynnhaven Mall and Town Center in Virginia Beach, plus one at Short Pump.
-end-

I’ve been by Patrick Henry hundreds of times, and I have to agree that it does need renovating. The mall has no “theme” at all. It’s just mostly … white walls? The mall is doing really well, though. But I am a little anxious, because it seems that a lot of malls die after their renovation. I mean Newmarket North (Hampton, VA–I wrote a feature for this mall for deadmalls.com, and then I accidenty deleted the damn thing off my computer. I’m in the process of writing it again for this blog) had a renovation in 1990, and by 1992 half of the mall was closed.

The mall is adding a new section that will include a Dick’s Sporting Goods store, a major national bookstore and a restaurant.

Ohhh man, that might suck. There’s a really nice Barnes and Noble that has been in the area since the mid 1990’s and I really hope it doesn’t kill business.

I’m going to try my best to get down there this week and take “before” pics.

Patrick Henry Mall to get a renovation

Filed under: patrick henry mall — Anita @ 8:03 pm

Set to start this month, the $25 million project will attempt to reflect the region’s colonial roots.

BY NOVELDA SOMMERS (Daily Press)
247-4767

Published April 3, 2005

NEWPORT NEWS, VA — Patrick Henry Mall in Newport News is shedding its 1980s image for a new style that will attempt to evoke the region’s colonial beginnings.

A $25 million renovation set to start this month will include a remodeled food court with a super-sized fireplace, hearth and mantle like you might see in a Colonial Williamsburg home, only more dramatic, with an 8-foot-wide mantle.

Early American-style sconces will grace pillars encased in rich, dark woods. New skylights will bathe the area in natural light, and cushy seats will invite shoppers to linger. Large chandeliers will have the look of giant colonial-era lanterns.

Still trying to place the ambiance? Think Williamsburg’s Merchants Square storefronts meet Norfolk’s MacArthur Center Mall.

“It will be a complete renovation: new floors, lighting, ceiling, restrooms,” said Michael Fenchak, mall asset manager. “We’re taking a 1980s mall to a current state-of-the-art property.”

The makeover comes as the region’s shoppers have more modern mall choices if they’re willing to drive about 80 miles. The region’s newest malls – Richmond’s Short Pump Town Center and Stony Point Fashion Center – were built in 2003. Short Pump departed from the traditional mall design with open-air shopping designed around a courtyard, and Stony Point’s high-end stores are grouped around two outdoor plazas.

Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust bought Patrick Henry in 2003 with the intention of updating it, said Cheryl Dougherty, vice president of marketing.

“It is one of the top performing assets in our portfolio,” Dougherty said. “We feel there’s still an upside in taking it to another level.”

Create Architecture Planning & Design, of New York City, is creating the mall’s look. The building contractors who will complete most of the work have not yet been chosen, mall officials said.

The mall is adding a new section that will include a Dick’s Sporting Goods store, a major national bookstore and a restaurant. Fenchak said he could not disclose the names of the bookstore and restaurant because the deals are not yet signed.

Dillard’s department store recently consolidated its two Patrick Henry stores, and where the empty store currently sits will be a number of small retailers forming a corridor leading to the new anchor stores, Fenchak said, adding that mall officials are not ready to announce the names of the stores.

Construction is expected to take place in three phases, with the bookstore and restaurant set to open before Christmas.

Dick’s Sporting Goods is scheduled to open in March 2006. The Pittsburgh-based sporting goods chain has 234 stores after its acquisition of competitor Galyan’s in July. The new store will sit between the mall and Interstate 64.

Dick’s stores are set up as a series of areas it calls “shops,” selling footwear, golf equipment, fitness and exercise gear and clothing.

According to its Web site, it carries brand names including Nike, Adidas, The North Face, Callaway, Taylor Made, and a store brand called Adirondack Trading Co.

The chain has stores at Lynnhaven Mall and Town Center in Virginia Beach, plus one at Short Pump.
-end-

I’ve been by Patrick Henry hundreds of times, and I have to agree that it does need renovating. The mall has no “theme” at all. It’s just mostly … white walls? The mall is doing really well, though. But I am a little anxious, because it seems that a lot of malls die after their renovation. I mean Newmarket North (Hampton, VA–I wrote a feature for this mall for deadmalls.com, and then I accidenty deleted the damn thing off my computer. I’m in the process of writing it again for this blog) had a renovation in 1990, and by 1992 half of the mall was closed.

The mall is adding a new section that will include a Dick’s Sporting Goods store, a major national bookstore and a restaurant.

Ohhh man, that might suck. There’s a really nice Barnes and Noble that has been in the area since the mid 1990’s and I really hope it doesn’t kill business.

I’m going to try my best to get down there this week and take “before” pics.

April 2, 2005

Dad Loves A Good Sale

Filed under: dead stores — Anita @ 7:36 pm

Google Images search results for “Bradlees”
…and don’t ask my why Lori Laughin is in some of the results.

This one’s my favourite. “Dad Walking At Bradlees”

I don’t really have any memories of Bradlees. I know was one in the Todd’s Center shopping center in Hampton, VA. But sometime in the late 80’s it was gone, it turned into a short lived FX Superstore, and then it the building was retrofitted into two buildings, and one building was a Big Lots (still there) and one was a Service Merchandise (left in 2000). A local art supply store; Paul’s Arts and Crafts bought the store, and they’ve been there sine 2001 or 2002. When I found out that the whole chain was going out of business in 2000, I said to myself “I thought Bradlees went out of business years ago!”

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